Biding Your Time: The College Application Process

Debby
Debby Bartz, UNHS Academic Adviser

Patience, internal fortitude, self-control and poise are all traits required when waiting for a college admissions letter. After all, the past year was spent studying, completing forms, preparing for important tests, writing essays, reading college websites, consulting with college admissions advisers and visiting campuses – one more time. 

 

It’s been a very busy time and now you are checking the mailbox daily for any letter that could contain good news from the multiple applications submitted. The formal acknowledgement is just around the corner—and it will be one of the first big decisions of your life. You will finally get to say, “YES! This is it, I’m going to ____________!”

 

Congratulations, if you’re an Early Decision or Early Action Admission letter recipient. Congratulations, if you have received a letter of intent and/or will be invited to National Signing Day. Congratulations, if you have been awarded a college scholarship. However, be advised that only a few colleges begin notifying students in mid-December to the end of winter (as early as late February). Be assured that many colleges load the mailboxes in March to late spring, and the most competitive colleges allow their applicants to test their patience until April Fool’s Day or later. Rolling college admissions is an ongoing process.

 

In the meantime, what should you do?

 

1.       Check online to review the status of your application.

2.       Check to see if pieces are missing from the application (e.g., order the necessary transcript, test score report or request a recommendation letter).

3.       Call the college if you do not receive an email confirmation within 10 days to three weeks after submitting the application.

 

Chill-lax. Waiting for a college acceptance letter means you are just like thousands of other students worldwide.

 

Author: University of Nebraska High School

Accredited online high school program providing award-winning curriculum to students in all 50 states and more than 100 countries.